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Connecting the Dots 2013 Speaker Bios

Stacey Bent
TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy, Chemical Engineering

Stacey F. Bent is the Department Chair of Chemical Engineering and the Jagdeep and Roshni Singh Professor in the School of Engineering at Stanford University, where she is appointed Professor of Chemical Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemistry, of Materials Science and Engineering, and of Electrical Engineering. Professor Bent serves as the Director of the TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy and a senior fellow in the Precourt Institute of Energy. Professor Bent obtained her B.S. degree in chemical engineering from UC Berkeley and her Ph.D. degree in chemistry from Stanford. After carrying out postdoctoral work at AT&T Bell Laboratories, she joined the faculty of the Chemistry Department at New York University. She moved to Stanford University in 1998. Professor Bent’s research is focused on understanding surface and interfacial chemistry and materials synthesis, and applying this knowledge to a range of problems in sustainable energy, semiconductor processing, and nanotechnology. Her group currently studies new materials and processes for electronics, solar cells and solar fuels, and catalysts.

As the Director of the TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy, Professor Bent oversees the center’s mission to make human electricity and transportation systems more sustainable for the long term. The center also aims to educate tomorrow’s energy leaders, through outreach events, course grants, and summer internship programs.


Rosamond Naylor
Rosamond Naylor
Center on Food Security and the Environment, Earth System Science

Rosamond Naylor is the Director of the Center on Food Security and the Environment, William Wrigley Professor in Earth Science, the William Wrigley Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, and Associate Professor of Economics (by courtesy) at Stanford University. She received her B.A. in Economics and Environmental Studies from the University of Colorado, her M.Sc. in Economics from the London School of Economics, and her Ph.D. in applied economics from Stanford University. Her research focuses on economic and biophysical dimensions of food security and environmental impacts of crop and animal production. She has been involved in many field-level research projects around the world and has published widely on issues related to intensive crop production, aquaculture and livestock systems, biofuels, climate change, food price volatility, and food policy analysis. At Stanford, Naylor teaches courses on the World Food Economy, Human-Environment Interactions, and Sustainable Agriculture.

Naylor currently serves on the Scientific Advisory Board for the Beijer Institute in Stockholm, is a Science Advisor for United Nation's Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon's initiative on Sustainable Development (Sustainable Agriculture section), and trustee of The Nature Conservancy California Chapter. Additionally, she serves on the editorial board of the journals Global Food Security and Journal on Food Security.


David Lobell
Center on Food Security and the Environment, Earth System Science

David Lobell is an Associate Professor in Environmental Earth System Science and Deputy Director of the Center on Food Security and the Environment at Stanford University. His research focuses on identifying opportunities to raise crop yields in major agricultural regions, with a particular emphasis on adaptation to climate change. His current projects span Africa, South Asia, Mexico, and the United States, and involve a range of tools including remote sensing, GIS, and crop and climate models.

Lobell's work is motivated by questions such as: What investments are most effective at raising global crop yields, in order to increase food production without expansion of agricultural lands? Will yield gains keep pace with global demand for crop products, given current levels of investment? And, what direct or indirect effects will efforts to raise crop productivity have on other components of the Earth System, such as climate? Answering these questions requires an understanding of the complex factors that limit crop yields throughout the world, and the links between agriculture and the broader Earth System.

Prior to his current appointment, Dr. Lobell was a Senior Research Scholar at FSE from 2008-2009, and a Lawrence Post-doctoral Fellow at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory from 2005-2007. He received a PhD in Geological and Environmental Sciences from Stanford University in 2005, and a Sc.B. in Applied Mathematics, Magna Cum Laude from Brown University in 2000.


Mark Zoback
Mark Zoback
Professor of Geophysics

Mark Zoback is the Benjamin M. Page Professor in Earth Sciences and director of the Stress and Crustal Mechanics Group in the Department of Geophysics at Stanford. He conducts research on in situ stress, fault mechanics and reservoir geomechanics. Zoback served on the National Academy of Energy committee investigating the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and on the U.S. Secretary of Energy’s committee on shale gas development and environmental protection. He was also a principal investigator on the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD), a research project that drilled through the San Andreas Fault to study seismicity at depth. Zoback’s awards include the Emil Wiechert Medal of the German Geophysical Society (2006) and the Walter H. Bucher Medal from the American Geophysical Union (2008). He earned three geophysics degrees: a BS from the University of Arizona, and an MS and PhD from Stanford.


Stefan Reichelstein
Stefan Reichelstein
Professor of Accounting at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business (GSB)

Stefan Reichelstein is the William R. Timken Professor in the Graduate School of Business and a senior fellow at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment. He is also an affiliate faculty in the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources (E-IPER). Reichelstein conducts research on the interface of management accounting and economics. Much of his work has addressed issues in cost- and profitability analysis, decentralization, internal pricing and performance measurement. In recent years, Reichelstein has studied the cost of reducing carbon emissions and the cost competitiveness of different energy sources. He has also introduced courses on sustainability and clean energy at Stanford. He has served on the faculty of the Haas School of Business at UC-Berkeley and at the University of Vienna in Austria.


Richard Luthy
Richard Luthy
Professor Civil and Environmental Engineering, Director of ReNUWit

Dick's area of teaching and research is environmental engineering and water quality with application to water reuse and management of contaminated sediments. His work addresses the fate of hydrophobic organic compounds, interdisciplinary approaches to understand the behavior and bioavailability of organic contaminants, and the application of these approaches to environmental quality criteria and new cleanup practices.


Michael Wara
Michael Wara
Assistant Professor of Law

An expert on environmental and energy law and policy, Michael Wara’s research focuses on climate policy and regulation, and on the role of new technologies in the electricity sector. Professor Wara SLS’06 was formerly a geochemist and climate scientist and has published work on the history of the El Niño/La Niña system and its response to changing climate. He received his PhD from UC Santa Cruz in Ocean Sciences Professor Wara joined Stanford Law in 2007 as a research fellow in environmental law and as a lecturer in law. Previously, he was an associate in Holland & Knight's Government Practice Group, where his practice focused on climate change, land use, and environmental law. Professor Wara is a research fellow at the Program in Energy and Sustainable Development in Stanford’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and a Center Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment.


Margot Gerritsen
Margot Gerritsen
Associate Professor of Energy Resources Engineering, Director, ICME

Margot Gerritsen is an associate professor of energy resources engineering and the director of the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering (ICME) at Stanford. Her work is about understanding and simulating complicated fluid flow problems, focusing on the design of highly accurate computational methods to predict the performance of enhanced oil recovery methods. She is particularly interested in gas injection and in-situ combustion processes. Outside petroleum engineering, Gerritsen conducts collaborative research on coastal ocean simulation, yachts and boating, pterosaur flight mechanics, and the design of search algorithms. She teaches courses on energy-related topics (reservoir simulation, energy and the environment) and mathematics for engineers. She also blogs and holds public talks on energy-related topics. Gerritsen earned an MSc in applied mathematics from Delft University of Technology, and a PhD in scientific computing and computational mathematics from Stanford.


Donald Kennedy
Donald Kennedy
Stanford University President, Emeritus , Bing Professor of Environmental Science, Emeritus

Don Kennedy is Stanford University President, Emeritus; Bing Professor of Environmental Science, Emeritus; and senior fellow, emeritus, at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, and at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. He recently served as editor-in-chief of Science, the journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. His research focuses on trans-boundary environmental problems, such as major land-use changes, economically driven alterations in agricultural practice and global climate change. Kennedy joined the Stanford faculty in 1960. From 1980 to 1992, he was university president. From 1977-79, he was commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. He earned an AB and PhD in biology from Harvard University.


Adam Brandt
Adam Brandt
Assistant Professor in the Department of Energy Resources Engineering

Adam Brandt is an assistant professor of energy resources engineering at Stanford. His research focuses on the environmental impacts of oil shale and other substitutes for conventional petroleum; mathematical modeling of petroleum depletion and the transition to oil substitutes; and capture and storage systems. As a teacher, his goal is to help train the next generation of energy professionals to optimize energy systems so as to improve their efficiency, rigorously account for the environmental impacts of energy sources and think critically about systems-scale phenomena in energy production and consumption. Brandt earned a BS in environmental studies with an emphasis on physics from UC-Santa Barbara, and an MS and PHD from the Energy and Resources Group at UC-Berkeley.


Joel Minor
Joel Minor
Graduate Student, E-IPER, Stanford Law School

Joel Minor is a second year law student, simultaneously pursuing a master of science degree in environment and resources from Stanford’s E-IPER program. Joel earned a bachelor of arts in environmental policy from Colorado College. In law school, he studies the law and policy of regulating the ongoing oil and gas boom with an emphasis on the role of local governments. In the E-IPER program, he explores the science behind pollution from the oil and gas sector, with a particular emphasis on air quality. Joel has worked on oil and gas issues with organizations including Environmental Defense Fund, the Sierra Club, and the Stanford Environmental Law Clinic. He will continue such work at Earthjustice this summer.


Scott McNally
Scott McNally
Graduate Student, Energy Resources Engineering

Scott McNally holds a bachelor of science degree in chemical engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. He is pursuing dual master’s degrees in energy resources engineering at Stanford and in public policy at Harvard University. Scott worked as a renewable energy project administrator at Austin Energy, a project development engineer at Shell Oil Co., an energy and climate research intern at the White House Council on Environmental Quality, and an Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education fellow at the U.S. Department of Energy.


Bryce Anzelmo
Bryce Anzelmo
Graduate Student, Energy Resources Engineering

Bryce Anzelmo earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the New Jersey Institute of Technology and a master’s degree from Columbia University. Under the direction of Klaus Lackner at Columbia, he studied ways to mitigate carbon dioxide directly from the atmosphere. Bryce worked for an environmental consulting firm in New York City before undertaking a backpacking exploration to study energy usage around the world. This drove him to pursue independent research in the energy sector at an advanced level. Bryce landed on the Farm in August 2012 in search of challenging questions that require a multi-disciplinary approach.


Drew DeWalt
Drew DeWalt
Graduate Student, Stanford Graduate School of Business

Drew DeWalt is a joint master of public policy and master in business administration candidate. Drew has focused his program of study on energy resources, energy policy and entrepreneurship. He recently completed his thesis work on distributed energy solutions for the Arctic. The thesis was sponsored by Stanford’s Hoover Institution. Prior to Stanford, Drew was a nuclear submarine officer in the U.S. Navy. He is working with two of his fellow classmates to develop a renewable energy project in Chile. The project will combine a large-scale solar array with a utility-scale energy storage unit. The development will address the unique needs of an energy grid in Chile’s Atacama Desert.


Sujith Ravi
Sujith Ravi
Postdoctoral Scholar, Environmental Earth System Science

Sujith Ravi is a postdoctoral scholar in the Department of Earth System Science and the Center on Food Security & the Environment. Sujith has an undergraduate degree in agricultural sciences from Kerala Agricultural University (India), as well as master’s and doctoral degrees in environmental sciences (hydrology) from the University of Virginia. Sujith’s research interests are in the areas of soil science, water resources and land degradation. He worked as an assistant research professor at the Biosphere 2 facility of the University of Arizona. As a postdoctoral scholar, Sujith is investigating the environmental impacts on land and water resources of large solar infrastructures in deserts, and exploring opportunities for integrating solar projects with agriculture/biofuels.


Placeholder image for Adam Pearson
Adam Pearson
Graduate Student, Civil & Environmental Engineering

As a 2012 MAP sustainable energy fellow at the National Audubon Society, Adam Pearson’s work focused on communicating recent rulings and guidelines issued by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service relating to wind energy and wildlife. Adam wrote a citizen's guide for civilians and activists to encourage cooperative and constructive contributions on wind development projects. This document laid out the legal background and existing expectations for pre-construction, construction, and post-construction wildlife assessment processes. Adam has also focused on this topic in two episodes of his energy/environment radio program, "Green Grid Radio."